To the elegy of the lost era: photographer Laurent Kronental "Souvenir d'un Futur" (memory of the future)

Whether it’s the actual visit or the impression of Paris left in any place, it’s all the shadow of Ottoman architecture. The Noisy-le-Grand in the eastern suburbs of Paris can overthrow your flower capital. Stereotype.

 

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"Souvenir d'un Futur" (memory of the future), is a French photographer Laurent Kronental Visiting the suburbs of Paris for four years, and continues to create a series of photography works. Talking about the origins of this plan, he said: "When I was walking around Courbevoie in 2010, I found a small street. When I walked there, the sight was like a surreal I was stunned by the straight buildings. I was fascinated by the poetic architectural appearance and lines. I went to visit a few elders, talked to them and became friends. After that, I gradually picked up. The camera photographed them and their lives. The gardens in front of these residents were in sharp contrast to the skyscrapers that surround them. I also started researching this kind of French government built after the Second World War to resettle the surplus population and immigrants. The "Grands Ensembles" (public housing) have generated interest; the more photos I took, the more I found their beauty and surprise. These buildings are not limited by time and space, and are constantly oscillating back and forth between the past and the present. I picked up the camera and recorded the process, starting to dig and share the pictures one by one. "

 

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In the 1950s and 1980s, the rise in housing prices, the movement of urban and rural populations, or the changes in immigrants led to the rise of public housing. Under the influence of Utopia, architects were full of ideals and let go of postmodernism. Architecture is intended to provide a new social residence with a different generation and ethnic integration. However, such a vision did not succeed. Instead, it finally dissipated like a bubble and was forgotten by the world under the torrent of time. Instead, they left residents who had never left, spending their old age here.

 

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"These buildings remind me of the image of the giant. In the image, the two parallel worlds of the past and the future are intertwined, and at the same time, the feeling of loneliness in the eyes of these residents is concealed. Human beings float like this in small flies. The huge, ghostly city is gradually being swallowed up by society. These elderly people have inspired me to talk to them and understand their lives. I deeply feel that I should show these images to the world and try to use them. Disintegration of the society, the established impression of the elderly," Laurent Kronental explained.

 

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Staring at the characters in the photo, under the sorrowful expression, it reveals a firm will and an elegant gesture, ignoring the growing age and external space. In these photos, the young figure is deliberately ignored, and the elders fill the void of space in these pictures. These buildings, which emerged from the era of rapid change in the pursuit of a beautiful and idealized utopia, have turned into a corner we forgotten, driven by material desires. Laurent Kronental preserves the faults and flaws of the forgotten generations through photography; examines these works, attempts to remove the social labeling of the elderly, and understands the over-praised youth, each generation has its own unique Beauty, the right and respect that the old man should have.

 

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"Souvenir d'un Futur" (memory of the future) is a reverie of the ageing society and the lost era, and an elegy that is still full of hope for the universe built by the entity. Through such a theme, highlighting the ratio and relationship between people and architecture, the city, Laurent Kronental reveals the era of the past, but also reflects the traces of the building fade. At the same time as the image output, the world is questioned and criticized. The current world focuses on the younger generation. Is there any other choice for the survival of the elderly and the elderly? They are like "Grands Ensembles". The times have passed, but they still stand here and should not be ignored. Laurent Kronental also revived the importance of society to the corners of the circle through this series of works.

 

Image Source: Laurent Kronental.

 

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To the elegy of the lost era: photographer Laurent Kronental "Souvenir d'un Futur" (memory of the future)

Whether it’s the actual visit or the impression of Paris left in any place, it’s all the shadow of Ottoman architecture. The Noisy-le-Grand in the eastern suburbs of Paris can overthrow your flower capital. Stereotype. "Souvenir d'un Futur" (memory of the future) is a series of photographs that French photographer Laurent Kronental visited for four years in the suburbs of Paris. Talking about the origins of this plan, he said: "When I was walking around Courbevoie in 2010, I found a small street. When I walked there, the sight was like a surreal I was stunned by the straight buildings. I was fascinated by the poetic architectural appearance and lines. I went to visit a few elders, talked to them and became friends. After that, I gradually picked up. The camera photographed them and their lives. The gardens in front of these residents were in sharp contrast to the skyscrapers that surround them. I also started researching this kind of French government built after the Second World War to resettle the surplus population and immigrants. "Grands...
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