New York fantasies, shouting poetry: street poet JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT, "Boom for Real"

All Images Courtesy of Barbican Centre unless stated otherwise.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, the predecessorThe legendary American artist, in his short life, whether it is artistic creation, distinctive personality or even styling, has left a wonderful chapter in the history of art, which still affects art, fashion and fashion. As street graffiti emerged in New York City in the 1980s, Basquiat's work now leaps to the peak of the art market; in May 2017, Sotheby's New York Art Night Shot set a new high price for the auction at $110 million.

Basquait's "Untitled" (untitled), drawn in 1982, set a new high price for the auction at $110 million. Photograph/ Shutterstock.
Basquait's "Untitled" (untitled), drawn in 1982, set a new high price for the auction at $110 million. Photograph/ Shutterstock.

However, after nearly 30 years of death, Basquiat, this For the past 20 years, it has not held a public exhibition at a large art institution in the UK, this time for the first time at the Barbican Centre in London.A collection of museums and private collections, more than 100 Basquiat's works, including paintings, photography, video and other works, as well as a variety of precious archives and videos, give everyone a great opportunity to learn more about the young artist's ins and outs.

Jean-Michel Basquiat on the set of Downtown 81, 1980–81, © New York Beat Film LLC, By permission of The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York, Photo: Edo Bertoglio.
Jean-Michel Basquiat on the set of Downtown 81, 1980–81, © New York Beat Film LLC, By permission of The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York, Photo: Edo Bertoglio.

This exhibition is namedBasquiat: Boom for RealA mantra from Basquiat, which appeared in two paintings on display - Jimmy Best in 1981 and Untitled (Crown in 1982) in 1982. Curator Eleanor Nairne explains: "This mantra is one of the favorite words when Basquiat is inspired. No one has ever used Basquiat's own words to name his exhibition - I think this is a powerful way. Can put the audience into Basquait's point of view."

Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

"I haven't been to the art academy. I only have to observe. I think the way I learn art is to keep watching art. ("I never went to art school. I just looked. That's where I think I learned about art by Looking at it.”)”—Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

"I haven't been to the art academy. I only have to observe. I think the way I learn art is to keep watching art. ("I never went to art school. I just looked. That's where I think I learned about art by Looking at it.”)”—Jean-Michel Basquiat.

At the entrance of the exhibition, he saw Basquiat's monologue of his artistic career. Basquiat, who had never been trained by the Orthodox Art Institute, left the school and his friend Al Diaz to enter the street graffiti creation at the age of 17 to open his artistic career. When the grammatical graffiti verses appeared on the streets of Manhattan and Soho, they also caused media attention and resounding - the symbols of free images and written sentences, with a bit of poetry, the graffiti signature "SAMO" is "all The abbreviation of Same Old Shit has also become an important symbol of Basquiat's early works.

"Basquiat: Boom for Real". Jimmy Best (1981) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
"Basquiat: Boom for Real". Jimmy Best (1981) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
"Basquiat: Boom for Real". Jimmy Best (1981) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

"Basquiat: Boom for Real". Jimmy Best (1981) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

"Boom for Real" spanned the two-story exhibition center of the Barbican Center, and the upstairs focused on the ecology of the cross-domain collaborative art circle that was flourishing in New York in the 1980s. In 1981, Basquiat participated in the large-scale joint exhibition "No York/New Wave" by No Wave curator Diego Cortez at the PS1 Art Museum (now MoMA PS1). This can be said to be an important turning point for Basquiat to enter the mainstream art world in New York. After that, it was popularized by many collectors and collectors. At this level, you can also see the semi-autobiographical film "Downtown 81" where Basquiat has been the protagonist, as well as his rare film archives in studio creations and interviews.

Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
'Like an Ignorant Easter Suit', Jean-Michel Basquiat on the set of Downtown 81 © New York Beat Film LLC. By permission of The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo: Edo Bertoglio.
Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Like an Ignorant Easter Suit, Jean-Michel Basquiat on the set of Downtown 81 © New York Beat Film LLC. By permission of The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo: Edo Bertoglio.

There are also many notes about the famous underground nightclubs of The Mudd Club and Area in New York. This is the base where the music-loving Basquait is always lingering. He also served as a resident DJ in Area. Basquait's conspicuous appearance and unexpected personality also made him meet many celebrities and stars here, including David Bowie, Madonna, Andy Warhol and more. At that time, Madonna was not famous, and she also shared a short relationship with Basquait. Madonna said during the interview that after they broke up, Basquait took all the paintings he had made for her back and painted black paint. In this retrospective of Barbican, Madonna personally took two daughters to visit and published multiple photos on her Instagram account. She also said: "My past meets with me now (My Past meets My Present )!"

Jean-Michel Basquiat and Madonna. Photograph/ Stephen Torton.
"Basquiat: Boom for Real". A Panel of Experts (1982) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Jean-Michel Basquiat and Madonna. Photograph/ Stephen Torton.
"Basquiat: Boom for Real". A Panel of Experts (1982) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Going downstairs to the exhibition room is like being in Basquiat's studio, with a multitude of inspirations coming from a wave; his personal collection of records, art epic collections, and movie collections. The portraits and lines in his unique form of creation are reminiscent of the graffiti that is hand-painted, or the “original art” of various symbolic symbols in the caves of prehistoric rock walls; however, the theme of Basquait can be said to be subtle and subtle. The discussion of issues such as colonialism and ethnicity often even mentions master art philosophies in art history.

Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Basquait's conscious metaphor in creation seems to be concealed, but it is all-encompassing, from tribute to film and television works, to punk, hip-hop, ancient Egyptian mythology, anti-racism and other elements. These cultural codes, such as books, music, and video materials, have become the style of graffiti painting, notepad, and text creation under the deconstruction, collage, and transformation of Basquait. His creative approach to transforming between painting and writing combines these different themes—as he himself says, “like a brushstroke” to draw in words.

Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
"Basquiat: Boom for Real". Untitled (1982) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Basquiat: Boom for Real. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
"Basquiat: Boom for Real". Untitled (1982) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Basquait's favorite jazz music, the sound of his experimental orchestra Gray, and the soundtracks of his TV shows and documentaries have been played throughout the show. Curator Eleanor Nairne said: "In this exhibition, we conducted a very comprehensive and in-depth investigation, hoping to faithfully reproduce the unique vibrancy of the lower city of New York, where Basquait was located. This is the first time that an exhibition will be held. The importance of music in Basquait's creation and life is directly presented."

Jean – Michel Basquiat (left) and his experimental orchestra Gray © Nicholas Taylor.
King Zulu (1986) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Jean – Michel Basquiat (left) and his experimental orchestra Gray © Nicholas Taylor.
King Zulu (1986) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Born out of a black family and without a teacher's atypical background, Basquiat still inspires many creators of the time and the future. His thoughts and responses to the race now seem to be still in the midst of the situation. The creative images are cohesive, cohesive, colorful and not cluttered, depicting everything with a unique style of painting.

Self-Portrait (1983) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Jean-Michel Basquiat on the set of Downtown 81, 1980–81, © New York Beat Film LLC, By permission of The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York, Photo: Edo Bertoglio.
Self-Portrait (1983) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo Tristan Fewings/ Getty Images © The Estate of Jean – Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York.
Jean-Michel Basquiat on the set of Downtown 81, 1980–81, © New York Beat Film LLC, By permission of The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Licensed by Artestar, New York, Photo: Edo Bertoglio.

In the "Boom for Real" exhibition, Basquiat smashed through images, sounds and texts, as if to return to our eyes. The all-encompassing exhibition is more like a prediction of today's huge maze of information, material and ideas. Basquiat's creation can give us a new space for thinking, where we can understand the things around us from different perspectives. .

Basquiat: Boom for Real
Barbican Centre/ Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS
Opening Hours: Mon-Sat/ 09:00 am–11:00 pm
Sun/ 11:00 am-11:00 pm
Bank Holidays: 12:00 pm–11:00 pm
Expanded until January 28, 2018

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